MINDFULNESS AND COUNSELLING

MENTAL HEALTH CARE PLAN
MENTAL HEALTH CARE PLAN – MEDICARE REBATE
June 23, 2018
SCIENCE OF THE ZZZZZZ'S
SCIENCE OF THE ZZZZZZ’S
June 23, 2018

MINDFULNESS AND COUNSELLING

MINDFULNESS AND COUNSELLING
Mindfulness is continually part of the banter from mental health professionals to the point where many clients feel they need to 'schedule in' mindfulness and counselling. There has been overwhelming evidence of the benefits of mindfulness based therapy including (but not limited to) stress reduction, improving your memory and focus.

These results speak for themselves in the clients and their reported changes in wellbeing. The step further to this is imbedding mindfulness into our daily lives outside the counselling room. Shapiro et al (2007) developed a theoretical framework for mindfulness that involved 'intention', 'attention' and 'attitude' of acceptance, openness and curiosity. These three elements give us insight into whats missing in our day to day life. Lets use the simple example of the old saying 'stopping to smell the roses'.

First the person stops (intention). They stop what they are normally doing with their busy life with school, work , schedules and chaos and just stop, intending on doing something different and simple. Something positive. Second, attention to the roses, focusing on the one sense (smell) but also observing it as unique and seperate to the world. Over time this practice will help shift the person's attitude and the feeling of being more present in their life. For right now, STOP! Intend on doing something small like smelling the roses. Notice how this makes you feel in your busy life. Overtime this will help you observe your mood more effectively but also lessen the intensity of those stressors. If you would like to have a one off session around slowing life down, contact the team today.




Barnes, S., Brown, K. W., Krusemark, E., Campbell, W. K., & Rogge, R. D. (2007). The role of mindfulness in romantic relationship satisfaction and responses to relationship stress. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 33, 482–500. doi:10.1111/j.1752– 0606.2007.00033.x

Hoffman, S. G., Sawyer, A. T., Witt, A. A., & Oh, D. (2010). The effect of mindfulness-based therapy on anxiety and depression: A metaanalytic review. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 78, 169 –183. doi:10.1037/a0018555

Jha, A. P., Stanley, E. A., Kiyonaga, A., Wong, L., & Gelfand, L. (2010). Examining the protective effects of mindfulness training on working memory capacity and affective experience. Emotion, 10, 54 – 64. doi: 10.1037/a0018438

Ortner, C. N. M., Kilner, S. J., & Zelazo, P. D. (2007). Mindfulness meditation and reduced emotional interference on a cognitive task. Motivation and Emotion, 31, 271–283. doi: 10.1007/s11031-007–9076-7

Shapiro, S. L., Brown, K. W., & Biegel, G. M. (2007). Teaching self-care to caregivers: Effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on the mental health of therapists in training. Training and Education in Professional Psychology, 1, 105–115. doi:10.1037/1931–3918.1.2.105

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